Tyres & Wheels Lift off oversteer

Discussion in '9th Generation (2012-2017)' started by Happyface838, Sunday 10th Feb, 2019.

  1. Happyface838 Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Brian Corby
    11
    8
    Was driving my Civic tourer in the rain the other evening and noticed that when I reduced throttle on a roundabout (not violently) the back end tucked in quite by surprise. I have conti on the front 4mm and some obscure '''chinese super ditch finders" on the rear.
    My head is telling me that the tyre choice (not mine, I hasten to add) is the culprit, but I'm reluctant to spend hundreds on new rubber if tthi is a known trait with the setup.
    If it is the tyres, any recommendations?
     
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  2. Zebster Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Swop the wheels front to back. Best tyres should always be on the rear.
     
  3. Happyface838 Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Brian Corby
    11
    8
    That's going to be my first thing, but although they're a better tyre, they're still pretty well worn, so I didn't want to swap and find the same characteristics without asking the question
     
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  4. Zebster Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    4mm isn't too bad! Worth a try...
     
  5. Sandy52 Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Sandy NORWICH
    264
    122
    Your best tyres should always be on the front- thats where the steering action and maximum brake force is applied, even on RWD cars.
     
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  6. Zebster Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    No, the most important thing is to prevent the rear breaking loose and rendering the car uncontrollable (which was the problem experienced by the OP). The AA also give this advice (scroll down to "New tyres to the front or back?")...
    https://www.theaa.com/driving-advice/safety/car-tyres
     
    Matt at H-Tune likes this.
  7. Matt at H-Tune Service Team H-Tune Staff

    A couple of things could be at play here.

    From experience of buying a few used cars before, handling can be dramatically affected by variations in tyre pressure.

    A couple of examples
    My MB4 (when I first got it) had 3 tyres at a massive 42psi, and 1 at 21psi. The first time I drove it, in the rain, it was directly to a garage to check the tyre pressures... once set to 32psi, they were spot on.

    My K10 Micra (daily driver) has recommended tyre pressures of 28psi all round, the fronts were on 28 and the rears were on 24. Once I changed reinflated the rears to 28psi, it responded a lot better to turn in.

    I'd also suggest having your 4 wheel alignment checked (and adjusted if required)...

    But crucially?
    Get your best tyres on the back for the time being.

    Also, The Uniroyal Rainexpert/Rainsport has been my go-to winter tyre for a few years, at £40-80 a corner, it really isn't a bad option instead of forking out for Conti's.

    Good luck and let us know how you get on. :Smile:
     
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  8. Sandy52 Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Sandy NORWICH
    264
    122
    If your rear end is trying to break loose I suggest you are driving too fast for the conditions.
     
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  9. Zebster Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Of course... driving too fast for the conditions makes most things worse. But - as the OP was complaining about - simply lifting the throttle on a roundabout can cause problems with the rear breaking away. Or hitting a slippery patch on a corner. Or swerving to avoid a child/dog running into the road. And all of these things will be far more severe if you have the worst tyres on the rear promoting oversteer.
     
    Last edited: Monday 11th Feb, 2019
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  10. Happyface838 Junior Member ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Brian Corby
    11
    8
    I can now confirm that part worn contis are definitely better than brand new Nippon nevergrips, swapped the around and the car is transformed .
     
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  11. Sandy52 Senior Member ★ ★ ☆ ☆ ☆

    United Kingdom Sandy NORWICH
    264
    122
    If your rear end is trying to break loose I suggest you are driving too fast for the conditions, or you are driving with illegal dangerously worn tyres.
     
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  12. Zebster Club Veteran ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Or - as proven here by the OP - it's because your rear tyres have much less grip than the front tyres.